L.a.240: Letter from Richard Broughton to Richard Bagot, 1577 May 13: autograph manuscript signed

Catalog record:http://hamnet.folger.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=230544
Collection:Papers of the Bagot family of Blithfield, Staffordshire
Preferred Citation:Letter from Richard Broughton to Richard Bagot, 1577 May 13: autograph manuscript signed, Papers of the Bagot family of Blithfield, Staffordshire. Transcription by Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO). MS L.a.240, Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, DC.
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Sir I thank you for your letters, as touching 26s.8d. of Walker I am glad my Partner
was so careful of so small thing, it were pity But she had commandment over greater & then
no doubt she would yield as good Accompt as is looked for that,: I am glad my Lady delighteth
to Sojourn so near that country, whereby I may more easily sometimes wait upon her Ladyship
& have her good Countenance in Any reasonable Cause I shall require. for your 3 geldings'
grass I think you shall not find it worth so great thanks, for once within seven years
I may be quit with you: with greater recompence. Abouts the end of August I intend
to trouble you, for mine own part not with any great Company, or friends, my Brother from
Cambridge & my Brother here Will I take down with me, as touching other of my friends
who in good will would wish and expect to show me their good wills in anything they may. it
standeth thus that abouts three years past communication of marriage had between my father & one Mr
Lee of Shropshire, after the same was in manner agreed upon upon some unkindness between Mr
Lee and my father, the matter fell to irrevocable choleric speeches & all turned upside
Down, whereupon (the occasion almost altogether ministered by my father, who passed not what
he did to make a Breach) because the same was not given over, if there grew mislikings,
in as friendly quiet sort as it Began. I took it in Angriest part of all, & for these two
years till Michaelmas last that from the Sea side I came through Shropshire I was not near
my father's nor these three years since the Breach suddenly grew in effect had no great
speeches with my father, nor neither wrote nor received any letter from him, Diverse times he
hath very fatherly sent his friends and mine to me, persuading me not to take it so strangely
affirming that for that place he was occasioned so suddenly for fear of further conclusions to
Deal, offering my present possession of all his inheritance, & himself & my mother & to be as
I would, Although the occasion of Breach being so offered I was not so greatly Discontented
therewith, because Mr Lee and his friends gave out it was but my slipper devise upon
some toy to procure my father to play the part, & that we quickly would be friends Again,
I have more strangely demeaned myself than I should of very just occasion, so far by
this long continuance that my father believeth I will never be reconciled, within these three
days there hath been one with me from my father, wishing me not to take it so strangely
& to do with my father's living my pleasure, I still with dutiful words make small
accompt of his living, wishing him to take the full benefit of the revenues thereof, &
for my Brother in Cambridge he needed no great exhibition for my Brother here I would continue the
finding of his exhibition, for my sister being married she was no charge unto him, And thus
taking small occasion or none at all to write I strangely remain Whereof he often maketh
his move to others, willing that by all the means they can to use persuasions with me
to pass some time in that Country. But for mine own part upon, the first Breach I determined
not to pass any long time in those parts till further occasion, & Besides whensoever
I should be towards marriage till it were finished I resolved that I would notnever
make my father & then by consequence not many of my friends privy of it. of which mind
for mine own opinion I continue, albeit I weigh that on the other side upon such prefixed
time your friends will perhaps minister private speeches why I so strangely on my friends'
Behalf do so demean Myself, & I had rather be fully made reconciled in dutiful
Amity with my father a month after than three months before. Nevertheless I am not
in this, nor will not in anything else, be so bent to my will, But if you shall shold it more
convenient, I do before fall in full remitter of Amity, I can for your satisfaction demean myself
that way. But for mine own opinion, I still remain of my first determined
opinion rather a month after than two months before, & for mine own part I
shall like it best if by my strangeness it fall out in speeches that I am
so strange with my father never likely to be in better case. for the state of my
father's living I have sufficiently already, as by his conveyance made to me enrolled
in the Chancery which I have left in my trunk in my partner's custody you may
perceive. so that if by death my partner should lose her partner I shall provide for
her out of that little a competent partner's part. as touching my partner's apparel
I have sent unto her the grave determination of a tailor & refer her liking
to herself by your Advice And her mother's, whose judgment in those things
is better than yours or mine & thus with 1577 commendations 3. Ides May
to yourself & Mistress Bagot, my Partner's and their sisters I commit you
to the tuition of the Almighty.

Yours ever as his own
Richard Broughton


My friend Raph Edge can tell you all the current news & therefore I will
not trouble you.



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